5 comments on “INVESTIGATING CLASSROOM DYNAMICS IN JAPANESE UNIVERSITY EFL CLASSROOMS: YASUYO MATSUMOTO

  1. I went into the .ppt file and read the content. It actually contains very little about EFL in Japan. It mostly seems to advocate adopting some UK and European method that my hunch is would only work for more advanced EFL students in E. Asia, the sort we see fewer and fewer of at most universities in Japan, unfortunately. For example, summarizing and paraphrasing skills. I couldn’t really find anything in the .ppt that shows it is actually based on the research data, analysis and findings, and more likely seems to advocate something that would appease a UK-based academic, the sort of whom oversaw and evaluated this project. Mostly irrelevant if you, like me, have to go teach classes in October and the average student will have a 250 on the TOIEC (if you are lucky).

  2. I think the thesis contains more useful information.
    >I went into the .ppt file and read the content. It actually contains very little about EFL in Japan. It mostly seems to advocate adopting some UK and European method that my hunch is would only work for more advanced EFL students in E. Asia, the sort we see fewer and fewer of at most universities in Japan, unfortunately.
    It depends on the level of students, I guess.
    >For example, summarizing and paraphrasing skills. I couldn’t really find anything in the .ppt that shows it is actually based on the research data, analysis and findings, and more likely seems to advocate something that would appease a UK-based academic, the sort of whom oversaw and evaluated this project. Mostly irrelevant if you, like me, have to go teach classes in October and the average student will have a 250 on the TOIEC (if you are lucky).
    No medicine can transform idiots to normal functional people no matter what teachers do. I hope this is not the case, but you may think this is the case. I am not a language teacher in any sense and I hate teach Japanese even to my friends. I did not learn English for the sake of English. I improved my English through using it more than 15 years. Improving English will never end but I need to do research as well which will requires English skills but it requires more than English.

    Learning a language is difficult. I am learning Dutch and French since normal people really do not speak English fluently in Antwerp. During conversation with many Belgians who do not use English very often, there is a moment of silence which I cannot tell if they do not like me or they cannot speak English or they are just farting. I would rather talk with them in Dutch if I can. (Many Belgian people do not see any reasons why they should speak English in their own turf which they think culturally inferior to their own, really.)
    Dutch is really difficult to learn since there are not so many books about it. You can learn English and French from books or multimedia up to a certain level since there are so many materials these days. But Dutch. I cannot find books I can use. In this sense, people who cannot learn English have no excuse. They should blame themselves.

    By the way, many Italian outside of main cities do not speak English either based on my experience and warning from some Italians.

  3. >Mostly irrelevant if you, like me, have to go teach classes in October and the average student will have a 250 on the TOIEC (if you are lucky).
    No one will get a PhD if they invented a teaching method that brings a TOEIC score of 250 to 450, though that might be the task teachers may have to engage. I would recommend these people not to waste their time in English since they will not go anywhere with their skill at their level. They should do what they can do best in their career.

  4. Pingback: Factors affecting English proficiency | A Pillow Diary of an Expatriate Scientist

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